Music Theory Symposium

Conservatorium Maastricht, Franciscus Romanusweg 90, Zaal Wyck

9.00-17.30

9.00-17.00

We would like to welcome you to the Music Theory Symposium of Conservatorium Maastricht!

This symposium is free of charge. You can apply via the link below.

Goal of the symposium is to share visions on theory education between departments Jazz, Music in Education and Classical. We want to create an open-minded environment where teachers of the departments are invited to present material, give workshops or do demo lessons. Students from all departments are very welcome to participate in the workshops and discussions.

Guest teachers are Barbara Bleij (Conservatorium Amsterdam) for specific focus on jazz theory education and Jaap Zwart (Conservatorium Amsterdam), for specific focus on solmization in relation to analysis and harmony.

Apply here

*Registration is possible until Friday 17 June 2022.

Programme Music Theory Symposium

Monday 20 June 2022

9.00

Inloop

 

9.30

‘Theorie-Atelier’ in Music in Education department; an integrative and topic-based approach
Inge Pasmans & Ian van Wolferen

Lesson demonstration

10.30

Understanding harmonic and melodic models through relative solmization and improvisation
Jaap Zwart

Workshop

11.30

Coffee break

 

12.00

In Search of Ancient Microtones;
Enharmonicism in the Music of Jean-Philippe Rameau

Aljoscha Ristow 

Presentation

12.30

Lunch break

 

13.30

Understanding harmonic and melodic models through relative solmization and improvisation
Jaap Zwart

Workshop

14.45

Coffee break

 

15.15

Vision on the Jazz theory curriculum of the Conservatory of Amsterdam
Barbara Bleij

Presentation

16.45-17.30

An (interactive) Harmonic Map – visualization and demonstration of harmonic possibilities in 12tone equal temperament and in just intonation
Sven Heinze 

Presentation

18.00

Diner

 

 

Tuesday 21 June 2022

9.00

Inloop

 

9.30

Understanding harmonic and melodic models through relative solmization and improvisation
Jaap Zwart

Presentation / Lesson

11.00

Coffee break

 

 

11.30

 

Applied Theory Combo
Greg Torunski & Matthias Nowak

Lesson demonstration

 

12.30

Lunch break

 

 

13.30

Vision on the Jazz theory curriculum of the Conservatory of Amsterdam – an example: "September Song" 1954 recording Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown
Barbara Bleij

Presentation / Lesson

14.30

The use of templates in music composition for film 
Leon Lhoëst 

Presentation

15.00

Coffee break

 

 

15.30

Performing Music Theory: Chopin Ballade nr. 1
Bart de Graaf 

Presentation

16.00

Improvised counterpoint
David Lodewyckx

Workshop

16.45

Conclusion

 

 

Ian van Wolferen – Inge Pasmans Abstract
‘Theorie-Atelier’ in Music in Education department; an integrative and topic-based approach 

Due to the changing demands of the professional music education field and the changing abilities of the music education student, the education department felt that an innovation of the theory curriculum was needed. Instead of frustrating students with abstract concepts and doing exercises detached from their practice, an integrative approach of theory components and styles was chosen. Generally speaking, students are more acquainted with certain pop repertoire than classical repertoire. By organizing the lessons around the same topic, a clear link between different styles and genres is made. New topics are introduced by experience, singing or playing, after which they will be analyzed. Finally, students create their own music with the given concepts. This way we seek to connect the theoretical topics to performance practice and educational practice.
In this interactive session we will demonstrate parts of a lesson on the topic ‘theme structures’ in both classical and pop context. Afterwards we will briefly present the lay-out of the course. In an open discussion we evaluate our experiences and discuss the possibilities and impossibilities of the ongoing innovation.

Inge Pasmans Biography
As well as being a main subject lecturer in Music Theory at Conservatorium Maastricht, pianist Inge Pasmans (*1980) teaches general theory subjects in the Music in Education department and the Classical Music department (Bachelor's program). She is currently coordinator of the theory section in the classical department, member of the Curriculum Committee and project leader of Music in the Making, an innovative and creative project in the Classical Music department. She holds MA degrees in Piano and Music Theory. As a pianist, she has performed with various chamber music ensembles, wind bands and choirs. As a teacher her interest lies with the music of the 19th and 20th century and in her lessons, she strives to integrate theoretical aspects and to apply relative solmization.

Ian van Wolferen Biography
Ian van Wolferen (1995) teaches music theory at the Music in Education department and Junior Conservatorium Maastricht. He is currently pursuing his BA studies in music theory with I. Pasmans and D. Lodewyckx. In 2017 he graduated from the BA program Music in Education at Conservatorium Maastricht, since when is teaching music at the Connect College in Echt. He was in past also active as guitar teacher at several music schools in the region. Apart from his teaching activities, Ian is an active pop musician in various projects.

Jaap Zwart Abstract
Understanding harmonic and melodic models through relative solmization and improvisation

In the first session the hand signs, developed by John Curwen, will be introduced to sing melodies and to experience music from within. Based on Curwen notation we will explore and sing in four parts from score. Through the experience of singing, we discover the melodic and harmonic models, used in classical music. Based on those models we will improvise as a three-voice-choir in the second session. In contrast with the tradition of given basses in harmony, the soprano will be the guiding voice.
In the third session we will use relative solmization and a numbered bass line to make a harmonic analysis of a repertoire piece of the 19th century. This analysis will serve as a scheme to improvise on a key instrument.

Jaap Zwart Biografie
Jaap Zwart grew up in a musical family and learnt music at a young age from his father Jaap Zwart sr. (1924-2001). Jaap Zwart studied piano and organ at the Amsterdam Sweelinck Conservatory. At The Hague’s Royal Conservatory, he graduated with Music Theory as his principal subject.
He is a teacher of music theory at the conservatory of Amsterdam within main subject group and he leads workshops ‘vocal harmony and improvisation’ for the international program Muziek als Vak at the Royal Conservatory The Hague. This program is based on the teaching and philosophy of the Hungarian composer Zoltán Kodâly.
In addition to his teaching activities, Jaap Zwart plays an active role both as a concert and a church organist. Year-round he gives many concerts throughout the Netherlands, with a wide variety of repertoire. He is especially known for performing unknown organ music from 19th  and 20th century. As a church organist, Jaap Zwart is connected to the Grote or Andreaskerk in Hattem and to the Grote Kerk in Harderwijk. Moreover, Jaap Zwart is a sought-after accompanist and pianist. He recorded several cd’s, among which recordings on the Bätzorgels in the Dom church in Utrecht and the Grote Kerken of Gorinchem and Harderwijk. For his last CD in 2014 he performed on the newly renovated Adema- organ of the Calixtus basilica in Groenlo. 

www.jaapzwart.nlwww.muziekalsvak.nl 

Aljoscha Ristow Abstract
In Search of Ancient Microtones
Enharmonicism in the Music of Jean-Philippe Rameau

Over the centuries, the meaning of the term ‘enharmonic‘ underwent significant changes. In the Renaissance, the term was still primarily associated with the ancient Greek concept of the ‘enharmonic genus’, which was based on a tetrachord containing two microtonal steps of approximately a quarter tone. The Renaissance theorist and composer Nicola Vicentino (1555), for instance, applied such ancient ideas of microtonality in his own vocal compositions and even constructed special keyboard instruments with 36 keys per octave to accompany them.
In the 18th century, this ancient Greek concept of the ‘enharmonic genus’ was revived again by the Baroque composer and theorist Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683–1764). Within a tonal system based on natural principles like overtones, he discovered that the quarter tone of the ‘enharmonic genus’ could in fact be found in the relation between two tones like D# and Eb, in other words, between two notes with a different name that are represented by the same key on a regular twelve-key keyboard. 
To clarify this further, Rameau pointed out that the “effect” of such an enharmonic quarter tone could in certain contexts even be “sensed” or “experienced” without an actual pitch difference. He exemplified this by referring to a number of passages from his own musical oeuvre, notably two movements from his ‚Nouvelles Suites de Pièces de Clavecin‘ (ca. 1728), as well as two scenes from his stage works ‚Hippolyte et Aricie‘ (1733) and ‚Les Indes Galantes‘ (1735).
During this presentation, we will listen to some of these examples from Rameau’s oeuvre and try to find out if we can actually perceive such ‘implicit’ quarter tones between two enharmonically related tones, as Rameau suggested it. Furthermore, it will be discussed to what degree such an understanding of enharmonicism might even already point towards the idea of ‘enharmonische Mehrdeutigkeit’ that has later been coined by G.J. Vogler (1802) and G. Weber (1817).

Aljoscha Ristow Biography
Aljoscha Ristow studied music theory at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam and at the Hochschule für Musik und Tanz in Köln, as well as composition in the young students programme of the Hochschule für Künste in Bremen. In 2013, he was awarded with the national prize at the German Bundeswettbewerb Jugend Komponiert competition. His compositions have for instance been performed by the Nomos Quartet, the Junger Kammerchor Köln, and a chamber music ensemble of the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen. As a music theorist, he gave presentations at annual conferences of the Dutch-Flemish Society for Music Theory (VvM) and the German-speaking Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie (GMTH). Since 2021, he teaches music theoretical subjects at the Conservatorium Maastricht.

Photo by Nine IJff

Barbara Bleij Abstract
Vision on the Jazz theory curriculum of the Conservatory of Amsterdam

In my first talk I will introduce the curriculum for music theory at the jazz department of the Conservatory of Amsterdam and its underlying principles. The core subjects ear training, analysis, and harmony are taught in an integrated way, as all subject matter should always be connected to the aural experience. The curriculum can be called 'analytical' because the music itself and the ear form the starting points to engage with the music. This engagement takes place against a solid theoretical backdrop. The point of departure is that jazz should be understood in its own terms but is also closely connected to Western musical traditions. Certainly, tonal styles do not require fundamentally new theoretical frameworks, but, rather, crucial modifications of Western theory to accommodate and explain the musical phenomena adequately.
In this talk I will also briefly address other theoretical approaches of jazz, and other contexts in which jazz could be taught at a conservatory, such as programs for music education (ODM).
In my second talk I will demonstrate what a concrete lesson could look like. The topic of this lesson is "September Song" from the 1954 recording Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown. The focus will be on the theme itself and on the Clifford Brown solo. This recording will serve to demonstrate the advantages of an integrated approach to jazz theory.

Barbara Bleij Biography
Barbara Bleij is a music theorist and pianist. She is senior teacher of music theory at the Classical and Jazz Departments of the Conservatory of Amsterdam. She is founding Editor of the Dutch Journal for Music Theory and former President of the Dutch-Flemish Society for Music Theory. Her research interests are Wayne Shorter, Clare Fischer, Lennie Tristano, and jazz theory pedagogy. She is currently working on a research project which contextualises jazz harmony theory and pedagogy.

Sven Heinze Abstract
An (interactive) Harmonic Map – visualization and demonstration of harmonic possibilities in 12tone equal temperament and in just intonation

We are used to think of harmony in terms of roman numerals or scale degrees. This method is very suitable for harmonic styles that are limited to (extended) diatonic harmonies. When it comes to romantic harmony, Bartok’s “polymodal chromaticism” or contemporary Jazz harmony, the system has its limitations.
I will present a MIDI-web app that opens up an alternative perspective on harmony by combining solmization and a modified Tonnetz. It can be used to visualize harmonic contexts, but also to retune incoming MIDI-notes to just intonation.
The beta version can already be tried out (only works in Google Chrome browser at the moment): https://harmonic-map-test.netlify.app/

Sven Heinze Biography
Sven Heinze (*1983) teaches theoretical subjects in Jazz and Classical departments of Maastricht Conservatory. He holds degrees in Jazz Composing/Arranging and Classical Orchestral Conducting. Apart from teaching, he conducts ensembles in diverse musical genres, plays piano, cello and cajon in jazz and pop bands and arranges/composes for professional and amateur ensembles across styles.

Greg Torunski, Matthias A. Nowak Abstract
Applied Theory Combo

Exemplifying lesson content of an ATCombo and its relevance in performance.
Details will follow…

Greg Torunski Biography
Greg Torunski, has been already noticed with the huge success on the dutch/german/american music scene last years. He graduated from Conservatorium Maastricht and Hochschule fur Musik in Köln with the highest grade. Afterwards he finished his Masterstudies in New York, working together with Mr. David Binney. 
During his career he has worked with different musicians including: Gino Vanelli, David Binney, Anouk, Marco Borsato. He played at numerous festivals in Greece, the Netherlands, Portugal opening his career widely and in a very promising way.
In 2011 he released his first debut CD "Changes". He was awarded with the prestigious "Hustinx Prijs" in 2012 and when he released his duo album "Moods" (Torunski Brothers) it was an instant hit (Break Thru New York Radio Awarded) in 2014.
2018 Best Instrumentalist Award at the Tremplin Jazz Festival in Avignon together with Torunski Brothers Quartet.

Matthias Akeo Nowak Biography
Matthias has studied orchestral music, jazz and popular music at Musikhochschule Mannheim, Germany and Queens College, New York. He participated in master classes with Charlie Haden, Drew Gress, Eric Harland and has played in classical orchestras, such as Young Austrian Philharmonic Orchestra and Junge Deutsche Philharmonie. After receiving the prestigious DAAD- scholarship in 2008, Matthias moved to New York to study at Aaron Copland School of Music, taking lessons with Antonio Hart, Michael Mossmann and David Berkman. Returning to Cologne, Germany, he found himself working in a variety of musical contexts, recording for Deutschlandfunk, WDR, HR, or Radio Bremen with his current bands Niels Klein Trio and Eos Chamberorchestra, Angelika Niesciers “ Sublim” and his own groups “ Koi- Trio” and „Common Ground“. Matthias is an intensly touring musician and has played on international festivals in over 40 countries, such as Jazz Utsav, New Dheli (IN), Eurojazz, Mexico City (MEX), or Jazzfestival Willisau, Willisau (CH).
He currently teaches Jazz Doublebass at Conservatorium Maastricht and Folkwang Hochschule Essen, Germany.

Photo by Sacha Ruland

Leon Lhoëst Abstract
The use of templates in music composition for film 

In composing music for film, one has to deal with different genres such as romance, drama, action, horror, and fantasy. For each genre there’s a global template in terms of melody, harmony, counterpoint, tempo, rhythm and orchestration that can be used in writing the music. Some examples will be given in this presentation.

Leon Lhoëst Biography
Leon Lhoëst is a teacher of Theoretical Analysis, Aural Analysis, Arranging, Music Composition for Film and World Music Composition at the Conservatorium Maastricht. Lhoëst studied Piano and Arranging at Berklee College of Music in Boston (USA) and he holds a Master degree of Jazz Composition and Arranging from the Royal Conservatoire of Brussels. In 1999 and 2001 he won the jazz composition competition of the Belgian Association of Authors, Publishers and Composers SABAM. Since 2001 he has his own column on jazz theory in the magazine Jazz&mo’, fka Jazzmozaïek. In 2016 he published his book “Ins en outs van Jazz harmonie”. Lhoëst has written compositions and arrangements for a variety of orchestras, including the Limburg Symphony Orchestra and the former big band of the Belgian broadcasting company BRT.

Bart de Graaf Abstract
Performing Music Theory

In this presentation, Performing Music Theory, I will examine how listening to recordings of musical performances may influence my analysis of Chopin’s First Ballade. Therefore, I take the music as heard in performance as the starting point for the analysis, rather than the score. By consulting recorded performances by various pianists, I will analyze how different performances may lead to different analyses. These analytical observations will concern phrase structure, harmony, topical analysis and form. The interpretation of form in particular is highly dependent on tempo choices that pianists make. In the case of the First Ballade, a piece with very few tempo indications, these choices vary widely.
I will show that in some cases clear analytical conclusions can be drawn from performances. And in other cases, rather far-fetched theoretical analyses must be made to describe the performer’s choices, demonstrating how problematic it is to base an analysis entirely on performances. What does that mean for the relationship between performer and theorist, and more particularly for the position of the ‘prescribing’ theorist, who considers analysis as a starting point in a musical interpretation? And what does this mean for the importance of the Analysis course at conservatories?

Bart de Graaf Biography
Bart de Graaf obtained master’s degrees as a pianist, musicologist and music theorist. He is appointed as a teacher of Music History and Music Theory at the conservatories of Maastricht and Amsterdam. In addition to teaching, he regularly performs as a pianist and works as a programmer for the Toonzaal and Theater aan de Parade, both in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. Bart also writes and presents introductions to concert programs for various Dutch concert halls and symphony orchestras, such as The Concertgebouw and Rotterdams Philharmonisch Orkest.
As a theorist, he will present his research about piano sonatas by Scriabin at the Annual Conference of the Musicological Society in Berlin in September 2022. Bart will present his research Performing Music Theory in an online lecture of the Dutch-Flemish Society for Music Theory in the fall of 2022.

David Lodewyckx Abstract
Improvised counterpoint

Before the publication of Barnabé Janin’s Chanter sur le livre (2014), the interest in improvised counterpoint in Renaissance style was limited to some experts (e.g. Peter Schubert, Jean-Yves Haymoz). But after Barnabé’s book came out, more and more professional and amateur teachers and performers are getting acquainted with this specific field of research and performance. In my session, I will introduce some of the techniques. Together with some students, I will demonstrate the sounding results by performing a couple of (semi-prepared) pieces. But we will involve you, the audience, as well. In the open discussion afterwards, we will evaluate what we did, and speak about possible integration of these skills at conservatory level: its applicability, possible learning goals, advantages, difficulties, disadvantages, …

David Lodewyckx Biography
David Lodewyckx studied music theory (‘Schriftuur’) at the Lemmeninstituut in Leuven (2003), musicology at the University of Leuven (2007) and one year of Erganzungsstudium Historische Musiktheorie at the Schola Cantorum in Basel (2014). He has been appointed as research fellow at the University of Leuven in several projects on music analysis (2007-2015) and has presented at many conferences and symposia (2009-2017). David has been teaching at different music academies and conservatories for almost 20 years. He currently teaches music theory at the Conservatory of Maastricht, music history and improvisation at the music academie in Tienen, and music theory, composition and improvisation at the music academy in Genk. David’s main expertise, skills and interests are in the field of historical music theory, counterpoint, harmony, historical keyboard skills (partimento, chorale, continuo), solfeggio and Formenlehre.